NOSA Acquires Border Run Race

3 courses for 3 times the excitement at N2E 2018!

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif; November 30, 2017 – The Newport Ocean Sailing Association has acquired The Border Run Race. With the acquisition, the 71st annual Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race will offer three courses for sailors to race on April 27, 2018. The primary N2E course to Ensenada and the Border Run course to San Diego are unchanged.

The third course, offered to attract high school and collegiate participants sailing Beach Cats, CFJ’s, 420’s, Moths, 29ers and Lasers will run to Dana Point.

NOSA officials said the acquisition and addition will bring back racers who have not participated in recent years, provide an opportunity to expose the next generation of sailors to the fun and challenge of a large race, and potentially help grow the future of the sailboat racing.

Longtime friends and racing enthusiasts Daniel Hodge, NOSA’s commodore, and Border Run proprietor Randy Reynolds, began talking this summer in hopes of resolving a potential date conflict. With NOSA’s acquisition, both men believe they’ve helped resolve a larger issue; overall participation.

“The coming together of participants, all starting on the same day, provides an exceptional opportunity for racers to be a part of something big, not only being a part of the race’s history, but to experience the unparalleled excitement of starting a race with 500 other boats,” said Hodge.

NOSA’s board approved the motion at its November meeting.

“It’s really for the good of the sport; it’s all about how to get boats out on the water, to make it the biggest event on the West Coast –- like it used to be,” said Reynolds. “Boating has changed a lot in the last 10 years, people are busier than ever. Some people will always want to go to Ensenada while others prefer the simplicity to stay in U.S. Waters.”

Hodge echoed the sentiment, “This is an excellent option for racers who want to sail N2E but are less confident when it comes to the logistics of sailing to Ensenada then returning home.”

Both men report that initial feedback has been great. “Randy and I are passionate sailors first,” said Hodge. “We were able to complete the acquisition because as sailors, we have a shared aspiration of creating energy that motivates others to get out on the water.”

Reynolds, who is primarily a boat designer, builder and sailor, has run the Border Run with his longtime partner Bob Long, for almost ten years. For many reasons, his race, like many others, has seen a decline in participation.

When the option came from NOSA to bring the two powerhouses together, it made sense, Reynolds said, “With the two races joining forces we have a better chance of bringing back the glory days of 400+ boats racing down the coast to the border.”

Although Reynolds will stay involved as an outside advisor, he is planning to be on the course this April.

It’s a happy ending for two races with an ostensibly wavy past. According to Reynolds, there was far less contention between organizations than the media depicted.

So, to answer a 2010 Sailing World article that questioned if these two races can coexist, the answer is yes.

For media comments or questions, please contact Laurie Morrison, NOSA Communications, at lmorrisonventures@gmail.com.